Results for keyword: tobacco history definition

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1. Text link: History of tobacco - Wikipedia

Domain: en.wikipedia.org

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_tobacco

Description: History of tobacco. Tobacco was long used in the early Americas. The arrival of Spain introduced tobacco to the Europeans, and it became a lucrative, heavily traded commodity to support the popular habit of smoking. Following the industrial revolution, cigarettes became hugely popular worldwide.

2. Text link: Tobacco: History of | Encyclopedia.com

Domain: www.encyclopedia.com

Link: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tobacco-history

Description: TOBACCO: HISTORY OF Tobacco generally refers to the leaves and other parts of certain South American plants that were domesticated and used by Native Americans for the alkaloid Nicotine. Tobacco plants are a species of the genus Nicotiana, belonging to the Solanaceae (nightshade) family; this also includes potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, belladonna, and petunias.

3. Text link: Tobacco - Wikipedia

Domain: en.wikipedia.org

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tobacco

Description: Tobacco is the common name of several plants in the Nicotiana genus and the Solanaceae (nightshade) family, and the general term for any product prepared from the cured leaves of the tobacco plant. More than 70 species of tobacco are known, but the chief commercial crop is N. tabacum. The more potent variant N. rustica is also used around the world.

4. Text link: Tobacco and the Origins and Domestication of Nicotiana

Domain: www.thoughtco.com

Link: https://www.thoughtco.com/tobacco-history-origins-and-domestication-173038

Description: Tobacco ( Nicotiana rustica and N. tabacum) is a plant that was and is used as a psychoactive substance, a narcotic, a painkiller, and a pesticide and, as a result, it is and was used in the ancient past in a wide variety of rituals and ceremonies. Four species were recognized by Linnaeus in 1753, all originating from the Americas, and all from the ...

5. Text link: History of Tobacco in the World — Tobacco Timeline

Domain: tobaccofreelife.org

Link: https://tobaccofreelife.org/tobacco/tobacco-history/

Description: History of Tobacco Timeline. Here is a brief glimpse into tobacco history and events. 6,000 BC – Native Americans first start cultivating the tobacco plant. Circa 1 BC – Indigenous American tribes start smoking tobacco in religious ceremonies and for medicinal purposes. 1492 – Christopher Columbus first encounters dried tobacco leaves. They were given to him as a gift by the American Indians.

6. Text link: The History of Tobacco - University of Dayton

Domain: academic.udayton.edu

Link: https://academic.udayton.edu/health/syllabi/tobacco/history.htm

Description: Tobacco is a plant that grows natively in North and South America. It is in the same family as the potato, pepper and the poisonous nightshade, a very deadly plant. The seed of a tobacco plant is very small.

7. Text link: history of tobacco : définition de history of tobacco et ...

Domain: dictionnaire.sensagent.leparisien.fr

Link: http://dictionnaire.sensagent.leparisien.fr/history+of+tobacco/en-en/

Description: Tobacco has a long history from its usages in the early Americas. It became increasingly popular with the arrival of the Europeans by whom it was heavily traded. Following the industrial revolution, cigarettes became popularized, which fostered yet another unparalleled increase in growth.

8. Text link: Tobacco | Definition of Tobacco at Dictionary.com

Domain: www.dictionary.com

Link: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/tobacco

Description: Tobacco definition, any of several plants belonging to the genus Nicotiana, of the nightshade family, especially one of those species, as N. tabacum, whose leaves are prepared for smoking or chewing or as snuff. See more.

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